Dwarf Anubias

Anubias nana

Picture of a Dwarf Anubias, Anubias nanaDwarf AnubiasAnubias nanaPhoto © Animal-World
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these are certainly slow growers, and are slow to establish. they require essentially no care whatsoever, and are difficult to kill. i would absolutely recommend... (more)  Barbara

   Dwarf Anubias make great beginner plants because they can adapt readily to almost any aquarium environment!

The leaves of the Dwarf Anubias are tough and leathery, are dark green with rounded tips, and grow to be about 3.2 inches long. This dwarf species of anubias is a great foreground plant since it only grows to a maximum height of 4.7 inches. They have a slow growth rate but are sturdy and can grow on rocks, wood, or in the substrate.

Anubias plants are usually undemanding in terms of how much light they need. If they are planted in the substrate, they should be provided with plenty of bottom fertilization, as well as a warm bottom. Carbon dioxide fertilization is also recommended.

For more Information on keeping a planted aquarium see:
About Planted Aquariums, Adding Aquatic Plants For a Healthy Aquarium

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Geographic Distribution
Anubias nana
Data provided by GBIF.org
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Distribution:

   They originate in West Aftrica.

Water conditions:

   Temperature: 72-82° F (22-28° C)
   pH: 6.0 - 7.5
   dCH: 2-15

Lighting:


   Light level: Minimal to Moderate - Anubias plants are usually undemanding in    terms of needed light.

Propagation:

   The rhizome produces side shoots, but also divides itself, producing new    plants

Availability:

   The Dwarf Anubias is readily available.

Author: Jasmine Brough
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Lastest Animal Stories on Dwarf Anubias


Barbara - 2006-02-14
these are certainly slow growers, and are slow to establish. they require essentially no care whatsoever, and are difficult to kill. i would absolutely recommend growing this on a nice piece of bogwood with some java fern in front of each other. the two were just meant to be together, and the anubias will be happier with its main root exposed.

Reply
Conor Paul Neill - 2010-04-22
I have practically all of my roots exposed and my plant has tripled in size in 4 months :)

Reply
Ryan - 2009-10-06
Will the dwarf anubias grow with the roots submerged in the substrate or does if have to be tied to rock or driftwood? Any pros and cons for the anubias if it is submerged in the substrate...

Reply
Yee Loon - 2007-07-05
Great plant.. would be better if tied to rock or bogwood. Not planted.

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