Amazon Swordplant

Picture of an Amazon SwordplantAmazon SwordplantEchinodorus amazonicusPhoto © Animal-World
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This is a beautiful plant, really easy to grow. looks great in any tank; the fish love to swim in the leaves and hide behind them. neat to learn that it is actually... (more)  Scruffy

   Amazon Swords are actually amphibious bog plants, but most can become completely aquatic if submerged for long periods!

Amazon Swordplants can grow to a maximum of 14 to 20 inches (35 to 50 cm). The leaves, being very long and fairly broad, make up the main part of the Amazon Sword plant. Their height and shape makes them ideal for background or mid ground decorations.

The leaves of the Amazon Swords can, and often will, grow above the surface of the water if the conditions allow it to do so. This trait makes them very popular for aquariums with a low surface level. However if you do not want the plant growing above the water, trim its roots and long leaves periodically. Also remove older leaves to keep the plant looking healthy.

Amazon Swordplants are relatively easy to keep, with a few basics to keep in mind. They do well in fine, iron-rich substrates, bright lighting, and fairly soft water. Be careful of high carbonate hardness levels, because this can affect how well the plant grows.

For more Information on keeping a planted aquarium see:
About Planted Aquariums, Adding Aquatic Plants For a Healthy Aquarium


Geographic Distribution
Echinodorus amazonicus
Data provided by GBIF.org
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Distribution:

   They originate in Brazil.

Water conditions:

   Temperature: 75-82° F (24-28° C)
   pH: 6.5 - 7.2
   dCH: 2-12

Lighting:


   Light level: Bright - 50 watts per 25 gallons

Propagation:

   They propagate by producing new shoots that act as runners and eventually separate from the plant.

Availability:

   The Amazon Swordplant is readily available.

Author: Jasmine Brough
Lastest Animal Stories on Amazon Swordplant


Scruffy - 2006-06-20
This is a beautiful plant, really easy to grow. looks great in any tank; the fish love to swim in the leaves and hide behind them. neat to learn that it is actually a bog plant. This site is great, so much to read and learn all under one URL ...NICE JOB

  • Anonymous - 2010-02-16
    Thanks Scruffy!
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hasib - 2010-05-16
I've bought about 50 amazon sword plants of two varieties....the shopkeeper said they both are same plants...but they differ from each other so much.....one has more round leaves than the other and it's taller too....I guess the taller and more round leaved plant is the real amazon sword...then what is the other one?

  • Bob - 2012-06-04
    Amazon sword plants are usually grown emersed (in the air) by the nursery. The reason for this is they grow much faster because more CO2 is available from the air. CO2 is the major building block for plants. Emersed leaves have a long stem with a leaf portion that is rounded (think lolipops). When the plant is immersed in water, it will shed the old leaves and grow new ones that have a short stem with a narrower, pointed leaf portion. Growth will slow down because there is less CO2 in the water. Now you should realize that CO2 is not a pollutant, but is savored by all plant life. No CO2 = no green!
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Anonymous - 2010-09-17
Very informative!!With the advice I get here,my aquarium is flourishing!

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Rick - 2007-11-07
I have 2 amazon swords in my 55 gal tank and they take up about a third of it each. They are a beautiful and easy to care for plant. I have about 3 1/2 inches of eco complete substrate on the bottom and 4 - 4 foot fluorescent tubes above. My 2 siamese algae eaters love lounging on the large leaves. A must have plant but they do grow quite large.

  • Anne Lohkamp - 2011-05-24
    I have had my two Amazon Swords in my fancy goldfish 55-gallon tank for about 3 months now and they have been doing well. All of a sudden, they both developed reddish-brown spots all over the older outer leaves. Have you ever had that happen? They have plenty of roots now and one has produced a shoot with new baby plants on it that I will anchor to the bottom of the tank as they grow larger. I was concerned there might be a disease so I cut off all the leaves with spots on them. What do you think is going on? any reply would be appreciated. thanks.
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